Spider-Man: Far From Home (a review)

I went with Wump and a few good friends to see this, the so-called dénouement, the love letter to Marvel’s first three phases of cinematic adaptation and the closing chapter in whatever you want to call this epic story. There will be other chapters, but this was the end of the one we’ve been living through so far.

I’ll put this much before the read-more break, and then move into spoiler territory: It was a great movie and we really liked it. I mean, was there ever really any doubt of that?

Beyond this point, there are spoilers and I am not going to bother spoilertexting because it makes shit annoying to read.

So, to specifics.

As usual, I guess I’m just going to list some of the things I really liked and some of the things I was mildly disappointed by, and offer my overall thoughts on the story and the movie experience.

Like I said, the overall movie was pretty great. I didn’t hate the Sam Raimi Spider-Man movies, mainly because Bruce Campbell was in them. And I didn’t really see the rebooted movies so I have no real opinion about them, although I understand why they happened. Now that Spidey has made the switch from Sony to a-little-bit-Sony-but-mostly-Marvel, the new reboots are easily my favourite movies so far. And his addition to Civil War basically made the movie for me (don’t get me wrong, it was a great movie anyway. But Spidey and Ant-Man were highlights).

And Spider-Man: Far From Home was a great sequel to Homecoming, and a really fun movie to watch.

So, yay.

What was good? Well, the characters, obviously. The dialogue and the writing in general were superb. Every character did exactly what they needed to do, and interacted amazingly. The school kids were like school kids. The Avengers-connected team was like a family. The families were family. Happy and Aunt May were cute as all get out, both individually and as a pair. It all just clicked perfectly.

The romantic sub-plot, for all that some of the events were pretty telegraphed and the potential-rival-suitor aspect was thoroughly clichéd, was fine. Wump had the occasional groan as she was watching things fall apart, because she was thoroughly invested from the start in Peter and MJ getting together (so was I, obviously). Every setback, every noble sacrifice Peter decided to make, every time he failed to stick to his Plan and give MJ the necklace he’d bought, Wump was flopping in her seat and going “of course you’re not going to say anything, ARGH where are you going now.”

Which added to the fun for me.

And MJ and Peter have adorable awkward chemistry up the wazoo, which I believe is the normal chemistry-secreting gland in teenagers, so that checks out. Rumours of their real-life romantic connection notwithstanding, Holland and Zendaya knocked it out of the park with the acting in this movie.

The movie dealt with Thanos’s finger-snap and the un-Snappening, which is now canonically called “the blip” (loved the PowerPoint movie at the start, wondered where they were going with that for a second and then laughed and laughed). It didn’t delve into the very obvious extremely dark hypotheticals that almost certainly occurred when the blipped people returned (as discussed at length in the comments somewhere under this post), opting instead to illustrate the event in an amusing way. And that’s fine. We know it was bad. But things got better, and this is a Spidey movie.

The romantic sub-plot, by the way, incorporated the blip in a really clever and interesting way (and that PowerPoint movie…), although maybe more could have been made of the fact that yes, a little kid who lived through the blipped years would now be a hunky teenager, but the teenagers who were blipped and then un-blipped might just have a bit of a problem with him being a hunky teenager – not, perhaps, quite so attractive a prospect as he might seem? But I don’t know, maybe my ancient 41-year-old self has forgotten what it’s like to be a shallow and horny teenager. A bit.

Anyway, it was cool.

Parker’s mourning over Stark was sweet to watch, and the plotline over the E.D.I.T.H. glasses (that acronym, *kisses fingertips* mmmwah) was really clever although ultimately sort of a McGuffin since Mysterio already had plenty of resources … but okay, here we go, let’s talk about Mysterio.

Jake Gyllenhaal was fucking amazing. I knew, from some source or other, that he was going to turn out to be the bad guy who was faking the big CGI monster attacks (quite literally CGI, in fact), but I didn’t know the details. So this brings me to the mild disappointment I felt in this movie. As usual with Marvel, it’s a mild let-down in the villain department.

Okay, so my first disappointment had already been building up, because Gyllenhaal is brilliant and did such a good job of seeming like a good guy that I didn’t want him to be revealed as the bad guy, even though I knew it was coming. It was gut-wrenching. So that wasn’t really a disappointment, because it was fantastically written and acted and the betrayal was fucking real. I would actually call that a plus for the character, even though it was a fucking sad plus.

My “second” disappointment was that the multiverse very strongly hinted at in the trailers and then fleshed out (to the point of giving the alternate Earths / realities their special comic book numbers) was itself a red herring. There may or may not be a multiverse out there, but it was a lie for the purposes of this movie. Mysterio was just a disgruntled former Stark Industries employee leading a bunch of other former Stark Industries employees on a grand revenge-and-fame scheme. Boo, that really kinda sucked. Sure, make Mysterio a fraud and make him the bad guy. But you could still multiverse us, couldn’t you? We’re ready.

Oh well.

The bad guy – with the reminder / disclaimer at this point that part of my disappointment was because of how well Gyllenhaal played him – was really my main gripe here. I get why they did it. They did it well. But I just didn’t like it as much as I would have liked … basically anything else. My third disappointment was pretty much the whole revealed actual-character and the plan that he had. What was the plan? After he’d “saved the world from an Avengers-level threat” and become an Avenger or a member of S.H.I.E.L.D. and killed Fury … what was his plan? Enjoy the sweet life until one or another of the actual Avengers came back? Keep faking it over and over and hope none of them stumbled on his tech which is super easy to stumble on? Create fake news and twist reality and public opinion so all the other Avengers were discredited and left Earth to him? What?

Plus, they’d already done the Fake News Villain-Maker in Iron Man 3. He was even an angry wannabe Stark adherent! They’d manipulated events and spun the politics and tried to turn the superheroes into villains throughout the Winter Soldier and Civil War arcs. They were done with that. Creating a final monster out of Stark’s technology really messed with Stark’s ending and legacy, and demonising the Avengers – especially Spidey, of all of them! – was dumb. We’ve seen the aliens. We saw Thanos. We know what’s what. Hopefully Phase 4 will fix this shit up because we don’t need it anymore.

Now, I’m not saying it wasn’t also done really well. They went in the wrong direction in my opinion, but they did it fantastically. They worked the Bad Guy Monologue into the script in a brilliant way (although what if Parker had touched literally anything or anyone in that bar? Just no), they linked it back to other MCU movies pretty flawlessly, and I really did buy the scheme (more or less) once it was revealed. I was disappointed not to have gotten what I was expecting, but I’m not going to cry about it because I am a Big Boy.

(Why did Mysterio go on chasing down Ned, MJ and Betty in particular even after his plan was pretty much fucked up and a bunch of other people probably knew his secret? Killing those three kids would not put the bunny back in the box, so the only real reason for him to bother was a lazy Bad Guy Wants To Kill Children device. That could have been left out, and five or six more “Peter Tingle” jokes worked in. But okay. Big Boy.)

The bad guys were fine. Gyllenhaal in particular was stellar. I only hope he makes it to a second movie because so few Marvel villains do. I’m not sure how they’d make it work without him going full Moriarty, but surely they could do something. Maybe he really could reveal that the multiverse is a thing, and that he controls the technology. Maybe he even stumbles on it by accident after his near-death setback, and becomes a Loki-style antihero because he tries to warn Fury and in true Boy Who Cried Wolf style he isn’t believed!

That might just be wishful thinking though. And admittedly, between this and the S.H.I.E.L.D. holograms and Thanos’s reality stone work (and the Skrulls!), we’re going to wind up wondering if any of it is real. So we should probably stop.

Oh, and the part of a Spider-Man (or any superhero) movie that I usually find painful – the angsting about the people he’s putting in danger, and the stupid lengths he goes to in protecting his secret identity – was all really well handled in this movie. To the point where it was a reasonably compelling and fun plot point (even if the “take off your clothes” scene was a bit on the ‘Allo ‘Allo nose).

Plus, this plot point gave us Night Monkey. Pure gold.

And the Peter Parker Is Spider-Man reveal at the end was brutal. Very nice book-end to Stark’s “I am Iron Man” at the end of the original movie, by the way. This really was the closure to the entire arc, wasn’t it?

Oh, and the harshness of that scene was softened – slightly – by the hysterical inclusion of J.K. Simmons’s J. Jonah Jameson coming back from the early 2000s to once again declare Spider-Man an enemy of the people and probably demand pictures of him.

Although as a sign of the times, maybe he will instead opt to demand there be less pictures of Spider-Man.

I even liked the final after-credits scene. Somehow the whole Nick Fury and S.H.I.E.L.D. being an illusion thing was a perfect ribbon around a movie that was premised on being an illusion. And it explained the slightly jarring “do not invoke her name” reaction to Spidey asking where Captain Marvel was … even though at the time I didn’t twig to it, I just thought it was Fury being Fury. All of that was very well-played … and it was yet another perfect book-end to the whole story. Chronologically, Captain Marvel and the Skrulls started the whole thing. Alright, Captain America really started it, but he got his closure. Now we have another beginning and ending, with Fury and Danvers starting the Avengers, and the Skrulls making a long-overdue appearance here in the final epilogue of the final chapter.

They were there all along. How many other stories actually starred them, rather than the characters we think they starred? See, this is where it gets to the point where anything could be an illusion, and it might be better to stop. But in this case, it was nicely done. And where the fuck are Fury, Hill and S.H.I.E.L.D.?

Well, where indeed?

Well worth a watch. I give it a Thanos’s chin out of a possible Bruce Campbell’s chin. Whether this makes it very close to perfect, or slightly better than perfect, really depends on how high an opinion you have of Bruce Campbell.

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16 Responses to Spider-Man: Far From Home (a review)

  1. aaronthepatriot says:

    We saw it yesterday, the girls and me…Dalia said it was the best movie she’s seen. But she said that after Endgame, and Captain Marvel, and Infinity War. Still, decent praise. I share a lot of your issues. Let me copypasta and respond this time. But first there is something you MUST see. It was shown before the previews in my theater. Tom Holland is AMAZING. Give this a little bit. If you start from the beginning you can see Zendaya’s dance number but it’s pretty bland.

    I’ll say no more about his performance for now so as not to bias you, but I do have more to say!

    “Okay, so my first disappointment had already been building up, because Gyllenhaal is brilliant and did such a good job of seeming like a good guy that I didn’t want him to be revealed as the bad guy, even though I knew it was coming. It was gut-wrenching. So that wasn’t really a disappointment, because it was fantastically written and acted and the betrayal was fucking real. I would actually call that a plus for the character, even though it was a fucking sad plus.”

    Gutwrenching and amazing, indeed. And I’ll add, a little lame, since he was mostly mad his invention was called BARF. Oh and then he got fired. I guess there was that. Jake was at the top of his charm game this whole movie.

    Here I’m going to add the extended taunt scene, while typical and done because this is a movie, was just ridiculous, overblown, and careless. Why did Spiderman need to know why Jake was doing this? Answer: he didn’t, WE did. He could have killed Spiderman at any point in that 3 minute sequence leading up to the train, and that was his “typical evil villain mistake” in not doing so.

    On the multiverse again I completely agree. We’re ready, I was sad this wasn’t it, give it to us already! And I think they will.

    “My third disappointment was pretty much the whole revealed actual-character and the plan that he had. What was the plan? After he’d “saved the world from an Avengers-level threat” and become an Avenger or a member of S.H.I.E.L.D. and killed Fury … what was his plan? Enjoy the sweet life until one or another of the actual Avengers came back? Keep faking it over and over and hope none of them stumbled on his tech which is super easy to stumble on? Create fake news and twist reality and public opinion so all the other Avengers were discredited and left Earth to him? What?”

    I know, right? I mean, if he had actual powers and that wasn’t all fakery and Stark technology, it would be one thing. He really could become the hero saving Earth if those powers were all really his and not fake. But since they ALL WERE FAKE and everything else could be done by Stark’s tech or Fury or many others…what a stupid plan. Basically, and we just have to accept this, he’s just a bad guy. Through and through. He didn’t want to save anything. He just wanted acclaim.

    And that kinda blows TBH.

    “Why did Mysterio go on chasing down Ned, MJ and Betty in particular even after his plan was pretty much fucked up and a bunch of other people probably knew his secret? Killing those three kids would not put the bunny back in the box, so the only real reason for him to bother was a lazy Bad Guy Wants To Kill Children device.”

    Gotta disagree here. The mid-credit final blow shows that he had plans within plans within plans, of course as did his faking his own getting shot on the causeway/bridge. He would have rebooted everything, blamed Spiderman for it all, and probably gotten away with it without those pesky kids. I totally get that part, that wasn’t a problem for me at all.

    “That could have been left out, and five or six more “Peter Tingle” jokes worked in. But okay. Big Boy.)”

    Do you even KNOW how much I wish they had done whatever payment would be necessary for the rights to colloquially call it “Peter Tinklage” a few times? “Let me get my Peter Tinklage on”, and so forth. LOL

    Next you mentioned the Skrulls, and I’m not complaining about my favorite Skrull being Nick Fury all along, cause he’s just so hilarious…. But why were they there? They went with Captain Marvel right? To a new world?

    I’ll do me one better: HOW are they there?

    “(even if the “take off your clothes” scene was a bit on the ‘Allo ‘Allo nose).”

    And what was the plan after that? The action was in Prague, why not wait until then? They just ended up giving him the suit which they should have done, and creating a lot of drama for him to fix which surely they didn’t want to do.

    “And it explained the slightly jarring “do not invoke her name” reaction to Spidey asking where Captain Marvel was … even though at the time I didn’t twig to it, I just thought it was Fury being Fury. ”

    Actually I still don’t understand that. I thought that was a weird statement no matter who was actually making it. There were a couple of flop lines like that, I thought. Trying to remember the other ones.

    In a few ways this movie was sloppy, and now that I wrote that I really wish I could remember the other lines. But one thing even my girls noticed was Peter’s bloodshot eyes on the jet at first were totally clear when he started making his suit a minute later. I was proud Dalia noticed!

    Ah yes, I remembered! The “execute them all” that was used to make Spidey look so bad. It sounded wrong as he said it. Why not “yes, do it” or “yes, confirmed”? The question was “do you want me to execute ON all drones?” or something. Not “execute all drones”. So the response was clunky and right then I saw it as tailored to get him in trouble.

    Bad form, Marvel.

    Loved how Nick’s vacation was just a room with a view, literally, at his headquarters. We LOLed at that reveal. And look how much everything falls to shit when he vacations even for a few days!

    • stchucky says:

      The uploader decided not to make that video available in my country, but I assume it’s the lip sync battle show where he dances to “My Umbrella”. It fucking rules, and has been consistently turning my SJW friends’ eyes into love hearts for a good year or more on Facebook. So fun to see.

      Anyhoo, will get to the rest of this as soon as possible!

      • aaronthepatriot says:

        That’s the one. He shows such a different character and confidence, totally at odds with his Spiderman persona. So I’m convinced he’s an excellent actor who will not be typecast. And has such talent and confidence!

    • stchucky says:

      Here I’m going to add the extended taunt scene, while typical and done because this is a movie, was just ridiculous, overblown, and careless. Why did Spiderman need to know why Jake was doing this? Answer: he didn’t, WE did. He could have killed Spiderman at any point in that 3 minute sequence leading up to the train, and that was his “typical evil villain mistake” in not doing so.

      You mean the bit where Mysterio kept Spidey in the illusion just one “turns out this was an illusion too” too many? Yeah, I tend to agree. Quite aside from the fact that it was a vehicle for a Bad Guy Monologue (which I suppose I could otherwise forgive), he seemed to have reality-stone level control over what Spidey was seeing and feeling, which seems impossible given that it was all just holograms and the damage – in fact anything physical – was done by drones.

      That just doesn’t seem like something he could maintain at that level for so long. Spidey was going to put his hand through something eventually.

      Still, I guess we just have to believe it was holodeck-level perfect even though the holodeck had force fields to make shit solid. It in turn was a vehicle to show us his Peter Tingle that could assert what was real. When convenient to the plot.

      Meh, basically it was fun to watch but – as with a lot of things in this movie – just maybe done one time too many, one order of magnitude too impressively.

      On the multiverse again I completely agree. We’re ready, I was sad this wasn’t it, give it to us already! And I think they will.

      Yeah. Let’s hope. dreameling sent me a cool link on Tor about the possibility of the Fantastic Four being introduced as the Guardians of the Multiverse for the MCU now that they’re all getting folded in. And the X-Men would seem like perfect contenders for alternate Earths.

      As long as the Sorcerers aren’t sidelined.

      I know, right? I mean, if he had actual powers and that wasn’t all fakery and Stark technology, it would be one thing. He really could become the hero saving Earth if those powers were all really his and not fake. But since they ALL WERE FAKE and everything else could be done by Stark’s tech or Fury or many others…what a stupid plan. Basically, and we just have to accept this, he’s just a bad guy. Through and through. He didn’t want to save anything. He just wanted acclaim.

      And that kinda blows TBH.

      Agreed.

      “Why did Mysterio go on chasing down Ned, MJ and Betty in particular even after his plan was pretty much fucked up and a bunch of other people probably knew his secret? Killing those three kids would not put the bunny back in the box, so the only real reason for him to bother was a lazy Bad Guy Wants To Kill Children device.”

      Gotta disagree here. The mid-credit final blow shows that he had plans within plans within plans, of course as did his faking his own getting shot on the causeway/bridge. He would have rebooted everything, blamed Spiderman for it all, and probably gotten away with it without those pesky kids. I totally get that part, that wasn’t a problem for me at all.

      Alright, fair to say. If he (felt he) could control the information to such an extent that the whole thing could still be salvaged and spun to his advantage, at the point after Spidey had smashed the hologram and revealed the drones, but he still needed to kill those three kids (including Spidey) in order to maintain that control … I guess. It just seemed like gratuitous moustache-twirling eee-vil to me.

      But you’re right about his plans-within-plans. I was also sort of trying to ignore that part, because the “didn’t really die on the bridge” implication was another of those moments where he made an illusion so convincing it conveniently stymied the Peter Tingle, and planning it in advance so well, just one time too many … basically I didn’t like it when Moriarty did that shit from “beyond the grave” in Cumberbatch’s Sherlock, and I didn’t care for it here. Is Mysterio alive and the whole thing was a trick again? Or is he dead and the final scenes were just a dead man’s switch set to destroy his victor?

      Either way gets lamer the more belaboured the whole plot point becomes, so – meh. Oh well.

      Next you mentioned the Skrulls, and I’m not complaining about my favorite Skrull being Nick Fury all along, cause he’s just so hilarious…. But why were they there? They went with Captain Marvel right? To a new world?

      Sure, twenty years or more ago. No reason for them not to have come back to help out later.

      My theory, when we see Fury in the Skrull ship (or at least Skrull-filled ship) at the end, is that he’s off on some new mission that we’re going to find out about in Phase Four, and he asked the Skrulls to come back to Earth and fill in for him a bit with the remains of the Avengers. So this was possibly their first time back on Earth after so long … but I guess we can’t really say that for sure.

      I’ll do me one better: HOW are they there?

      *snicker*

      And what was the plan after that? The action was in Prague, why not wait until then? They just ended up giving him the suit which they should have done, and creating a lot of drama for him to fix which surely they didn’t want to do.

      Yeah, I find it hard to believe they couldn’t have gotten him a Night Monkey suit that would fit without fuss, and probably also look significantly different to Spider-Man so as to allay suspicion. And a very brief brainstorming session with the writers would surely have found some better way of creating relationship tension and rivalry with the new hunk which could then be resolved by MJ having half a brain (as it was), without the “take off your pants” thing.

      I mean, even that scene could have worked if we then got a three-second shot of that same woman at the end, arguing with another Skrull about how she should have handled the situation. There, problem solved, she was an untrained infiltrator.

      Ah yes, I remembered! The “execute them all” that was used to make Spidey look so bad. It sounded wrong as he said it. Why not “yes, do it” or “yes, confirmed”? The question was “do you want me to execute ON all drones?” or something. Not “execute all drones”. So the response was clunky and right then I saw it as tailored to get him in trouble.

      Bad form, Marvel.

      Yeah, that was pretty lame too. Another very brief session with the writers would have cleared that up.

      All in all though, no real complaints from me. As long as they makey with the fuckin’ multey versey toot fuckin’ sweet.

      • stchucky says:

        I mean, even that scene could have worked if we then got a three-second shot of that same woman at the end, arguing with another Skrull about how she should have handled the situation. There, problem solved, she was an untrained infiltrator.

        I mean okay, we can just assume that anyway because basically all the S.H.I.E.L.D. people were Skrulls, right?

        So we can maybe excuse it. I still would have liked to see it acknowledged though. It would have improved both that scene retroactively, and the end-credits scene in general.

      • aaronthepatriot says:

        “I mean okay, we can just assume that anyway because basically all the S.H.I.E.L.D. people were Skrulls, right?

        So we can maybe excuse it. I still would have liked to see it acknowledged though. It would have improved both that scene retroactively, and the end-credits scene in general.”

        All good points and I hadn’t made that conclusion, but I think you’re right. So it makes “more sense” now, in that how it makes no sense makes sense, if that’s clear.

        “Sure, twenty years or more ago. No reason for them not to have come back to help out later.”

        Ahh, but Captain Marvel came back solo in Endgame, and that was just…what…a few months before this? I don’t think it washes, mate.

        “Alright, fair to say. If he (felt he) could control the information to such an extent that the whole thing could still be salvaged and spun to his advantage, at the point after Spidey had smashed the hologram and revealed the drones, but he still needed to kill those three kids (including Spidey) in order to maintain that control … I guess. It just seemed like gratuitous moustache-twirling eee-vil to me.

        But you’re right about his plans-within-plans. I was also sort of trying to ignore that part, because the “didn’t really die on the bridge” implication was another of those moments where he made an illusion so convincing it conveniently stymied the Peter Tingle,”

        *AHEM* PETER TINKLAGE, come on! First you didn’t reply to my invitation to my budhole, now you ignore this. Have you no soul?

        Anyway yeah, I really think he was this level of crazy smart.

        Although I do agree with your points about how the uber-complex illusions set up on the fly would have broken through from time to time, to Peter’s benefit. Still, really disorienting.

        “Yeah. Let’s hope. dreameling sent me a cool link on Tor about the possibility of the Fantastic Four being introduced as the Guardians of the Multiverse for the MCU now that they’re all getting folded in. ”

        The problem for me here is they have so ruined the Fantastic Four that this doesn’t grip me in the slightest, LOL.

        And they’re really not on the power level of many of the Avengers, right?

        My vote is Green Lantern! And let Ryan Reynolds loose this time, full reboot including rebooting the same actor!

      • stchucky says:

        But isn’t Green Lantern DC?

        And I don’t see how Captain Marvel coming back solo and saying basically nothing about what she’s been doing precludes any of the Skrulls helping out in any capacity either since, or even before that point. We don’t have eyes on that set of decisions.

      • aaronthepatriot says:

        “But isn’t Green Lantern DC?”

        Shit, is it?

        “And I don’t see how Captain Marvel coming back solo and saying basically nothing about what she’s been doing precludes any of the Skrulls helping out in any capacity either since, or even before that point. We don’t have eyes on that set of decisions.”

        Well the logistics are a nightmare any way you try to time it though, aren’t they? Hell, even figuring out how she got back, what, 2 hours after Thanos jumped forward in time is a bit of a nightmare. Sure, space stone portal but how did she KNOW so fast?

        And for all these options, WHY are Skrulls, again? To give Shield agents much needed vacation? Or to divide and conquer, double up, etc.? Why after just getting settled would they come back to do that?

        Nevermind how overjoyed I am they did, as I said! Now I want to see that actor in his other roles!

        Options:
        1) She was in the neighborhood. That makes it hard to get the Skrulls there in any reasonable time, right?
        2) She parked the Skrulls nearby while she fought Thanos, horribly irresponsible
        3) She came back alone somehow, also a bit problematic but maybe portaling, and back to 1) for the issue with the Skrulls
        4) They all came back for the battle but we only saw her…really not likely but ok.

        Are there any more reasonable scenarios I’m missing? You think she can space-stone-portal an entire transport ship now? That thing was huge! Maybe she can but pics or it didn’t happen!

        I love that they’re back, but fucking how? XD

      • stchucky says:

        I was working on the theory that the Skrulls and Captain Marvel were separate and independent entities with their own ships? Indeed Captain Marvel doesn’t even need a ship, so that works?

        I just don’t see how their involvement is any sort of problem, especially if you’re happy they’re there? If you’re annoyed and don’t want them in the movie, sure, I can see there are plenty of plot issues we could hang them with. And I was sort of leaning in the direction of thinking they were a bit too much illusion-all-along in a movie full of illusion-all-along. But ultimately was fine with it.

      • aaronthepatriot says:

        So I guess they now have that jump technology with the hexograms in space, which they didn’t have before, or something.

        I guess. I kind of thought hiding from the Kree was their primary directive, so they might not even be in this galaxy anymore, at least in terms of a homeworld.

      • stchucky says:

        “Unclear.”

      • stchucky says:

        Proper response, I wasn’t being intentionally glib yesterday but I couldn’t think my way around whatever corner there was in this line of discussion. To be honest I’m still not sure I have anything to add. I’m thoroughly confused by this.

        But isn’t Green Lantern DC?

        Shit, is it?

        Yup. Closest they got to referencing it was in Deadpool, don’t think we’re likely to see it again. Closest Marvel has is the Kree at this point?

        And I don’t see how Captain Marvel coming back solo and saying basically nothing about what she’s been doing precludes any of the Skrulls helping out in any capacity either since, or even before that point. We don’t have eyes on that set of decisions.

        Well the logistics are a nightmare any way you try to time it though, aren’t they? Hell, even figuring out how she got back, what, 2 hours after Thanos jumped forward in time is a bit of a nightmare. Sure, space stone portal but how did she KNOW so fast?

        No idea. I’m guessing she got back for that final fight in pretty much the same way everyone else did: with some help from the Sorcerers. Either that or she hexagon’d in, or something else. Don’t see that it really matters but yeah, the timing of all of it can be thrown into question if you’re of a mind to.

        And for all these options, WHY are Skrulls, again? To give Shield agents much needed vacation? Or to divide and conquer, double up, etc.? Why after just getting settled would they come back to do that?

        See, this is where you lost me. I can think of plenty of scenarios where, after (or during) twenty-odd years of doing assorted stuff, they’d come back to offer some help to S.H.I.E.L.D. – I mean, presumably half of them got wiped out, then restored, so add that to the saved-them-from-genocide debt if they showed up post-Endgame. It’s been a little while since the blip now, and … yeah I’ve got nothing. The Skrulls being in the movie to provide backup for the new S.H.I.E.L.D. organisation and to make an amusing end scene that changes the rest of the movie, none of it poses any challenge to my acceptance and enjoyment. Don’t know what to say.

        Nevermind how overjoyed I am they did, as I said! Now I want to see that actor in his other roles!

        Right?

        Options:
        1) She was in the neighborhood. That makes it hard to get the Skrulls there in any reasonable time, right?

        I don’t see how? Are the Skrulls dependent on her for their movements? Also what movements and timeline are we talking about here? What’s reasonable time, for them to be a part of whatever Fury is doing?

        2) She parked the Skrulls nearby while she fought Thanos, horribly irresponsible

        I don’t think this happened?

        3) She came back alone somehow, also a bit problematic but maybe portaling, and back to 1) for the issue with the Skrulls

        I can’t see why the Skrulls are part of her travel back to Earth for the Endgame fight. I have only seen each movie once though.

        4) They all came back for the battle but we only saw her…really not likely but ok.

        I don’t know.

        Are there any more reasonable scenarios I’m missing? You think she can space-stone-portal an entire transport ship now? That thing was huge! Maybe she can but pics or it didn’t happen!

        I honestly don’t have any idea what this discussion is about. What’s a reasonable scenario in this epic comic fantasy context? Maybe they all got swallowed by the Flerken moments after the end of Captain Marvel, and it coughed them up later on.

        My understanding was that the events of Captain Marvel happened, the Skrulls went one way to enjoy their lives and a new homeworld, and Danvers went her own way to defend the galaxy against assorted evil?

        Then, twenty years of off-screen adventures later, Thanos destroyed half of all life and Danvers brought Tony back to Earth, then there was five years of blipped universe where she went mostly off-screen and kept the peace around the galaxy again, then the Avengers unblipped everyone and Thanos counterstruck and Danvers came back again to be part of the fight.

        Then, a few months after that, Mysterio attacked.

        Only at that last point do we know the Skrulls were on Earth, filling in for Fury and Hill who were doing something else. They could have shown up, I’m guessing, at any point between the end of Endgame and a week or two before the beginning of Far From Home. Or, indeed, sometime during the events of Far From Home. Or at any point during the blipped five years. Or before that, even, in the twenty years after Fury first met them.

        Any and all of these will need confirmation and explanation in-story. But we don’t have that yet.

        So what’s the issue? That absence of explanation is unacceptable? That’s fair enough. I think it’s fine but I don’t know what else to say.

        I love that they’re back, but fucking how? XD

        I’m baffled at how this is a sticking point of any kind.

        So I guess they now have that jump technology with the hexograms in space, which they didn’t have before, or something.

        See this whole thing has always baffled me, what is it and where did it come from? How long has it been around and how does it fit into the technological and mythological framework of the MCU? It might have been cool if this was the technology the Light Speed Engine was all about, but that seems too recent. And the Light Speed Engine was a McGuffin anyway?

        I guess. I kind of thought hiding from the Kree was their primary directive, so they might not even be in this galaxy anymore, at least in terms of a homeworld.

        After Captain Marvel, it seems like Danvers handled the Kree anyway? The Skrulls were presumed gone, Ronin and the Accusers became an extremist group, and we don’t hear much about them until Guardians of the Galaxy.

      • aaronthepatriot says:

        And now I will apologize, because I was fine with “unknown” from yesterday! But thank you for writing all of this.

      • stchucky says:

        Nah I figured we were all aware that this is shit that the movies will have to address when the time comes, but until then we can only shrug and speculate.

        I’m all for the speculation but I wasn’t sure if I’d missed something and as such was just not getting why this was a sticking point.

      • aaronthepatriot says:

        The short answer is no, you aren’t missing anything. I disagree with a couple of the things that are settled in your opinion, but it’s really not worth going around and around about them.

      • stchucky says:

        Sure, fair enough if you say so, cool with me either way! Put it down to me not really being super-knowledgeable about these plots and events. Like I say, only seen once and I’m a shallow viewer except in some extremely specialised definitions of the concept.

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