Rehabilitation

Day 36. 83 pages, 40,131 words.

So it seems another pair of Australian brains-trusts have been caught smuggling drugs in Indonesia, and now they’re on the brink of execution.

Okay, so this didn’t happen recently – in fact the whole “Bali Nine” thing is actually ten years old now, and these guys have been in prison ever since – but their appeals are all played out and their executions are now imminent because Indonesia, like much of Southeast Asia, has absolutely no sense of humour about drugs.

In this case, it was heroin – a bigger deal (no pun intended). And these two were the ringleaders of the operation, while the others of the Bali Nine got life in prison straight off. And these were the first death sentences ever laid down by court of that area.

Now, “both Sukumaran and Chan are currently in Kerobokan Prison awaiting the completion of their sentence via execution, having exhausted all appeal opportunities.” And “on 2 February 2015, Indonesia’s Attorney General confirmed Chan and Sukumaran will face the firing squad in the next round of executions.” So all this whining and petition-signing aside, they’re pretty much fucked.

Anyway, I signed the petition.

Mercy for the idiots?

Saint Chucky: Saving the world, one insensitive rant at a time.

My first suggestion, re: the above, would have been to give perma-prison space to the guys who are improving things in there, and execute a couple of people not pulling their weight. Turn prison into a meritocracy and get them competing for life itself, if it’s that barbaric and overcrowded. I guess it’s fair to say I’m in favour of the death penalty for some things, but it gets really difficult. For example, there’s zero room for wrongful convictions. And in cases of death and torture and all the horrible things that might deserve a death penalty, where do you draw the line on that? Does the guilty party have to have wielded the knife? Or is simply being an integral cog in the machine (as drug dealers and mules clearly are) enough to earn you a bullet?

Indonesia obviously thinks so. Back in the day, Prime Minister John Howard basically nailed it:

“The police are there to protect us from the ravages of drugs and I just hope that every young Australian who might in their wildest imagination think that they can get away with this will take a lesson from this … I feel desperately sorry for the parents of these people. I do. All of us as parents will feel that way, but the warnings have been there for decades.”

Yes. This is exactly right. And yet I still signed the petition, for what good it will do.

The more I look into it, the more fucked-up it gets – as tends to be the way with these things. There was evidence of coercion and all sorts of other evil shit, other members of the Bali Nine being forced to smuggle for fear of what the higher-ups, including Sukumaran and Chan, would do to their families.

Can these evil little scumbags change in prison? I hope so. That’s what prison is meant to be for, after all. And if ten years doesn’t do it, let’s see if sixty years does. Either way, keep them out of my world.

But if they’re helping in there? If they’re a resource? Why not keep them?

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3 Responses to Rehabilitation

  1. thelinza says:

    I lol’d at Australia’s hypothetical return to being a penal colony. Then I lol’d at the word penal. Then I facepalmed at myself.

    I’m not sure I believe that the other seven deserve to have life in prison, so much as life as civil servants, but I have little sympathy for these named two. There’s something in anglo culture which has convinced people that their actions will have no serious consequences, and that our nations will always protect us no matter how retarded we choose to be. Which is incorrect. If I murdered someone in Finland, America would leave my ass. If someone knowingly goes to South Korea to ‘spread the word of God’ (read: propagandize an already propaganda-soaked people), then they get thrown in jail. I don’t think it’s worthwhile or even correct to go help people who knowingly and willfully break laws while abroad.

    • thelinza says:

      Addendum: Civil service can basically be jail, so IMO there could be a program where we force people with repeat drug convictions to tag along with a social worker and see all the lives they’ve ruined.

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